Review: MUSYNX

Rhythm and dance games were pure gold back in the day. Games like Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) and In the Groove blessed arcades, captivating the hearts of fans worldwide, only to be lost and forgotten through the course of time. Until now, that is, as MUSYNX completely rejuvenates the genre and brings it into your home on the Nintendo Switch. You’re definitely going to want to play this one.

Much like the inspiration, MUSYNX is a dance-based video game that utilizes songs and dance steps which are performed with the Switch Joy-Con controllers. Succeeding in this game requires you to have good timing, as each step is tethered to a button on the controller. Up, down, left, right, and double steps are all there, and it’s mostly variations of each command that you can expect to encounter in each song. It’s odd, however, that MUSYNX doesn’t exactly punish you for being absolutely terrible like in similar titles, where poor performance often leads to failure and restarting the song. Instead, MUSYNX understands that you’re bad at the game and continues playing as if it’s blatantly turning a blind eye, which is nice for one’s personal self-esteem.

When it comes to music, MUSYNX nails almost every song on the head, as the song selection includes a variety of wonderful J-pop tracks and more. Some tunes are 8-bit inspired, while others are explosive dubstep songs – both of which are absolutely welcome. There were a few tracks, however, that I didn’t like, mostly because they didn’t fall in line with my own personal taste in music – but hey, to each his own.

As a DDR veteran, MUSYNX really hit the spot. However, for someone completely new to dance games it may be pretty daunting. Some tracks run at high beats per minute while others run a bit slower, but regardless if the song is fast or slow, the step implementation is plentiful. This actually brings me to my only true gripe with the game: There’s really no middle ground with regard to game difficulty. For instance, you have a not so difficult setting and you have an extremely difficult setting, both of which can be challenging at times. Low difficulty usually includes a decent amount of steps that most gamers can handle, while the toughest mode releases an onslaught of directional arrows that will likely cause your brain to melt. The reality behind this is once you’ve gotten a hang of it and essentially remove your training wheels, there’s no middle ground so you have to go straight to slamming down the steepest hill possible and attempt to jump over 18 Apache helicopters. Scary, right? Having a middle range of dance stages could easily glide gamers into higher difficulties, and it would definitely be preferred if the developer wishes to retain newly interested individuals in this game.

MUSYNX is an incredible game that should not be overlooked by anyone who considers themselves a DDR or ITG patriot. There’s definitely some similarities between this game and the inspiration, and that’s OK. In fact, it’s great! The selection of tunes is varied and has something for everyone, but the level of difficulties go from zero to sixty which can be daunting for new players.